Red lights on EHC?

Rottweiler

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Here is the manual for Axel's EHC for a 2004. It says to install a 25 amp inline fuse before the EHC.
Also from this post page # 37
I just put in the fuse. But that surge protector sound cool.
 

LittleMike

Member
Here is the manual for Axel's EHC for a 2004. It says to install a 25 amp inline fuse before the EHC.
Also from this post page # 37
I just put in the fuse. But that surge protector sound cool.
Oh thank you!
I will definitely fuse it also.
I sure hope this is the issue. Curtis said all red leds means its toast.
 

knothead

RIGID4LIFE
Supporting Member
Oh thank you!
I will definitely fuse it also.
I sure hope this is the issue. Curtis said all red leds means its toast.
When you order it from Curtis it will already come with the fuse link in....all you have to do is hook it all up
 

LittleMike

Member
Here is the manual for Axel's EHC for a 2004. It says to install a 25 amp inline fuse before the EHC.
Also from this post page # 37
I just put in the fuse. But that surge protector sound cool.
Thanks Rottweiler, it says you can do some cool adjustments. Bonus!
 

Sven

Well-Known Member
Diagnosing a computer bike goes something like this.
ON = This means the processor only moves in two ways. Either there is a magnetic hold so flow travels.
OFF = Or this move is to stop the flow and this is not magnetized to hold a gate open for flow, but stops.

60 cycles per second = This is more a controlled wave length that man can manipulate. The physical part on the motherboard uses an integrated chip [IC] or what is known as a 555 timer. This part is the 60 cycle exploiter. Think of blinking Christmas lights. Slow is the blink, or it's going on/off so fast, these 3 movements consist of a held charge of current up a wire like the speed of the rpm of the engine. This current charge has a wave length due to the making of magnetism up the wire and determines rpm.

To know the next speed coming in, the 555 acts like a toilet. The tank is holding that charge or wave length. The handle is the trigger that empties the last wave converted to speed. The capacitor was just emptied or discharged and the cycle starts over again. That's how the tach works, that's how fuel injected determines how much fuel per that wave length of rpm speed (we keep it simple).

Flip Flop 1 = Notice how it goes (+) to (-) or better known as flip-flop. So it's Threshold [of an electrical value saved], then Triggered [to empty the capacitor], then that Discharge [to ground] is now ready for the next rpm, wheel spinning up, or wheel slowing down with the front end in the air, or ABS as it flip-flops the wheel from locking and puts you back in control, done thousands of times a second goes the flip-flopping.

Codes = The very simple but complex diagnosing of a code. A code can only occur with 3 movements. The wire is out of the connector is one. The connector not connected is two. The jobber is short to ground/broken wire inside/signal out of range is basically the third one, but that was grabbing a branch of the root of the trouble code. The root to a code is a no signal or a value out of range.

Analog = This is the whole concept of the computer's input signal. The jobber is making many values of input. Say the jobber is the crank sensor. It's just a magnet and a sweep of the cup breaks the signal at the open cut of the cup. It took how long to break the contact. It was (+) ON. The window made (-) current and flop is the magnetism cut at the moment. You can use this as one concept as flip-flop occurrence.
Digital = Whereas, this means only one of the same value is shown. So the basis of the black box converting a different analog value is a working processor, no LED's or check engine light (CEL) on the dash. That means there is no-constant-single-digit-as-the-input. You now apply wire out and see no sig as a single digit that codes. You see the connector shows the analog is not in play; and the digit is now coded on the black box or car's dash. You know the jobber has all the wires connected outside, but inside the jobber; it burnt like a fuse and that says digit or no signal.

Flip-Flop 2 = So code is the single digit being sent in over and over. Note that the wire out/connector not connected is a loop. You did have (+). But with that wire is burnt/is out/not connected, it goes digital. That means flip was at the magnetic hold. Flop, it no longer can, so that second movement is (-). Where did (+) go to then? It held all the LED's ON = Self Coded BRICK.
 
Diagnosing a computer bike goes something like this.
ON = This means the processor only moves in two ways. Either there is a magnetic hold so flow travels.
OFF = Or this move is to stop the flow and this is not magnetized to hold a gate open for flow, but stops.

60 cycles per second = This is more a controlled wave length that man can manipulate. The physical part on the motherboard uses an integrated chip [IC] or what is known as a 555 timer. This part is the 60 cycle exploiter. Think of blinking Christmas lights. Slow is the blink, or it's going on/off so fast, these 3 movements consist of a held charge of current up a wire like the speed of the rpm of the engine. This current charge has a wave length due to the making of magnetism up the wire and determines rpm.

To know the next speed coming in, the 555 acts like a toilet. The tank is holding that charge or wave length. The handle is the trigger that empties the last wave converted to speed. The capacitor was just emptied or discharged and the cycle starts over again. That's how the tach works, that's how fuel injected determines how much fuel per that wave length of rpm speed (we keep it simple).

Flip Flop 1 = Notice how it goes (+) to (-) or better known as flip-flop. So it's Threshold [of an electrical value saved], then Triggered [to empty the capacitor], then that Discharge [to ground] is now ready for the next rpm, wheel spinning up, or wheel slowing down with the front end in the air, or ABS as it flip-flops the wheel from locking and puts you back in control, done thousands of times a second goes the flip-flopping.

Codes = The very simple but complex diagnosing of a code. A code can only occur with 3 movements. The wire is out of the connector is one. The connector not connected is two. The jobber is short to ground/broken wire inside/signal out of range is basically the third one, but that was grabbing a branch of the root of the trouble code. The root to a code is a no signal or a value out of range.

Analog = This is the whole concept of the computer's input signal. The jobber is making many values of input. Say the jobber is the crank sensor. It's just a magnet and a sweep of the cup breaks the signal at the open cut of the cup. It took how long to break the contact. It was (+) ON. The window made (-) current and flop is the magnetism cut at the moment. You can use this as one concept as flip-flop occurrence.
Digital = Whereas, this means only one of the same value is shown. So the basis of the black box converting a different analog value is a working processor, no LED's or check engine light (CEL) on the dash. That means there is no-constant-single-digit-as-the-input. You now apply wire out and see no sig as a single digit that codes. You see the connector shows the analog is not in play; and the digit is now coded on the black box or car's dash. You know the jobber has all the wires connected outside, but inside the jobber; it burnt like a fuse and that says digit or no signal.

Flip-Flop 2 = So code is the single digit being sent in over and over. Note that the wire out/connector not connected is a loop. You did have (+). But with that wire is burnt/is out/not connected, it goes digital. That means flip was at the magnetic hold. Flop, it no longer can, so that second movement is (-). Where did (+) go to then? It held all the LED's ON = Self Coded BRICK.
Does it matter if it's carburator or a fancy paint job? Mines non EFI and black.
 

Sven

Well-Known Member
Same applies for the spark box with carb. Spark box is a processor. Has your advance calc'd, rpm, etc. Paint is optional.
 

LittleMike

Member
I installed the new ehc and all the lights come on as normal so yahoo on that. It turns over but won't start. ugh I hate electrical issue
 

LittleMike

Member
Gotta be one of these

B - Engine will turn but not start:
Check for spark.
Check for loose connections at coil and battery.
Check ignition module.
Check the crank position sensor.
Check continuity to the RUN/OFF button.
 

Sven

Well-Known Member
Gotta be one of these
So I talked to an EE and sure it makes sense that the capacitor acts as a balancing of the frequency. Who cares, it still can be calc'd as a 1/on or 0/off.. are those two movements.

B - Engine will turn but not start:
Check for spark - You can run this one trick that shows spark from your hand to the plug. At the cam cone where the pickup and cup are, you move it so the open window is at the edge of the steel core coming out of the sensor's magnetic pickup. Lay the flat blade on the open window edge, bend the blade so it taps the core and just keep tagging on and off as you have key on, leads not on the bike or it will fire off, but you look for spark that way. Toggle went to every jobber in the loop = No problem found.

Check for loose connections at coil and battery - There are no loose battery connections if it turns over no spark. Coils are pretty much bulletproof short of the body cracking from heat expansion. Resistance wise you have those readings on the pages.

Check ignition module - Let's say 3 wires off the coil? So both piggy over each other is key to coil, spark box to same side. Other side is crank pickup. If you toggle the pickup, have the spark box wire hooked to an ice pick test light, key on, toggle the cup/core, does the light flicker? Unless the pages show how to test, this is more or less watching on/off happen.

Check the crank position sensor - By toggling, the spark box shows signal. Can't be the crank sensor if it starts there, ends at the plug. That leaves it down to the coil. Crank/S makes E up the wire. Spark box converts to trigger the on/off at the coil. Coil shows no joy as the next jobber in line.

Check continuity to the RUN/OFF button - Bike turns over with the kill toggled to off? Say it ain't so. Leave it in gear, kill is off and down she goes? Has continuity at the switch. And ground is collapsed as off with kill on? You'd feel it toggling the lever as it can't pull ground off the coil? And since you have the coil wires off, toggle the switch and there you go.

Pickup travels to coil side. Spark box waits for how much rpm is coming in so it sets at this advance number. Coil sends the spark. Spark lead is last wire out as a replaceable jobber. Spark plug sparks.

Jobber Loop:
Crank sensor
Coil
Spark box
Coil leads
Spark plugs
 

Mikeinjersey

Active Member
Gotta be one of these

B - Engine will turn but not start:
Check for spark.
Check for loose connections at coil and battery.
Check ignition module.
Check the crank position sensor.
Check continuity to the RUN/OFF button.
What do you mean "all lights come on as normal". Do you mean headlight, blinkers and brake lights all work correctly? No start could mean you have an ignition or fuel problem. Make sure your getting fuel to the carburetor then start troubleshooting the Ignition system. Look for a red light on the ignition module after you hit the run switch. If you do get the light your getting power to the Ignition module and if it blinks while cranking the engine your getting the signal to fire the coil. Pull the plugs and ground them while cranking the look for spark. If no spark suspect a bad coil if you get one plug to fire suspect a bad plug or plug wire on the cylinder not firing.
Your possible problem list is ok except you have a cam sensor on an 04 bike not a crank sensor. Same function different location.
 
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