Out the shop

Jerome Yee

Member
Just got my 107 S&S Ironhorse out the shop, took it in cause it would die while on road, start right back up and go for a bit then die again. When I took it in I thought it might be Cam sensor, but was told by mechanic I have duel ignition and wouldn't have sensor, so he changed plugs and found dirty float bowl replaced and installed new jet #31..
So it rode home fine. I took it to gas station filled up tank went home then next day took her out and it started up again she died on me about a mile from house, same symptoms as before, it felt like she ran outta gas but it was full tank.. check petcock it was on. I'm taking back to shop any idea brother ? This is the work he did
 

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Jerome Yee

Member
If it was fire problems wouldn't it be hard to start ? She starts right up even after she dies and I have to give lots of gas and ride the clutch some to get any distance.. Glad I wasn't that far away.. Thanks Knothead.
 

Jerome Yee

Member
I had that same issue with my 2010 bulldog and in my case it ended up being a bad ignition switch. I made a wire jumper to bypass the ignition switch and the problem went away, replaced the switch and never had another issue.
I had that same issue with my 2010 bulldog and in my case it ended up being a bad ignition switch. I made a wire jumper to bypass the ignition switch and the problem went away, replaced the switch and never had another issue.
I'll mention that to mechanic, did it have any problems starting with bad switch ?
 

knothead

RIGID4LIFE
Supporting Member
If it was fire problems wouldn't it be hard to start ? She starts right up even after she dies and I have to give lots of gas and ride the clutch some to get any distance.. Glad I wasn't that far away.. Thanks Knothead.
Well usely they dont fire right back up if it the cam senor/ ignition module dual set up....they usely have to cool a few minutes and sometime longer....so back to what 41bigdawg said you could have a bad key switch...when you get time fire the bike up and wiggle the key switch and see if it dies....you can also look at the wiring off the coil to make sure it all connected properly....also check your coil for cracks while your there to rule out that area...there is several things to check honestly...

You could check the flow out of your gas tank....also check flow on the hose going to the carb to rule out gas tank and fuel line issues...

Check you ground wires and hot wires from the battery...check ground wire on your starter....

Like i said its a process of eliminations to deternine where the issue lies...
 

Jerome Yee

Member
Well usely they dont fire right back up if it the cam senor/ ignition module dual set up....they usely have to cool a few minutes and sometime longer....so back to what 41bigdawg said you could have a bad key switch...when you get time fire the bike up and wiggle the key switch and see if it dies....you can also look at the wiring off the coil to make sure it all connected properly....also check your coil for cracks while your there to rule out that area...there is several things to check honestly...

You could check the flow out of your gas tank....also check flow on the hose going to the carb to rule out gas tank and fuel line issues...

Check you ground wires and hot wires from the battery...check ground wire on your starter....

Like i said its a process of eliminations to deternine where the issue lies...
Roger that brother thank you.. One step at a time..
 

Jerome Yee

Member
Well usely they dont fire right back up if it the cam senor/ ignition module dual set up....they usely have to cool a few minutes and sometime longer....so back to what 41bigdawg said you could have a bad key switch...when you get time fire the bike up and wiggle the key switch and see if it dies....you can also look at the wiring off the coil to make sure it all connected properly....also check your coil for cracks while your there to rule out that area...there is several things to check honestly...

You could check the flow out of your gas tank....also check flow on the hose going to the carb to rule out gas tank and fuel line issues...

Check you ground wires and hot wires from the battery...check ground wire on your starter....

Like i said its a process of eliminations to deternine where the issue lies...
I have another question if you have the time
My bike registers as an American Ironhorse Outlaw, it's a107 S&S 1863 cc. However stamped on the trans it's says a S&S Sidewinder, so is the bike an Outlaw as registered on Pink Slip and Insurance quoted me? Or the Sidewinder that's engine stamped unsure?
 

Mr. Wright

Guru
Supporting Member
Okay, just making sure you knew there was a difference. Some people keep calling Big Dogs, Harleys. Some of the same parts was used on both of them. Engine, transmission stuff like that
 
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Mikeinjersey

Active Member
Best and possibly the only way to troubleshoot an intermittent cam sensor is to replace it. $50 and worst case you have an extra if you ever need one. I had the same symptom but it was a crank sensor ( basically same as a cam sensor) only difference was mine needed to cool down like knothead says. Contact HDM and ask if this is the same part as Ironhorse.
 

Sven

Well-Known Member
... she died on me about a mile from house, same symptoms as before...
Let's say what it's not:
1. coil
2. switch
3. spark unit
4. processor black box
5. carb
6. plugs
7. loose wires
8. bad ground

Let's narrow it down to something usually being one thing on the runs-heats up-stops running. Are we talking about a good clutch lever when cold and a lever goes to the grip is the center nut backing out, is the same pattern for the black box to turn into a brick? Or is this your heat cycle of the bike stopped on me, had it cool down and started again kind of scenario?

So is this the sign of a processor on its way out, or the sensor having a heat stroke, minus 4 LOL.

When I left the house the carb, coil, spark unit, wires, ground, is the switch going on and putt-putt to the gas station I go. Tank is [especially] topped off and we are talking within feet if not yards of stalling due to non-venting at the cap. The carb/coil/unit/plugs lit that bike off again is a clean carb if it idles/starts right up, one kick if not a push of the button in a 1/4 of a second, sans a one kick bike in other words... No cleaning needed.

I'm taking back to shop any idea brother ? This is the work he did
Receipt wise, I do not find a fast starting bike as a carb needing cleaning. Say yes it starts like right now and you get your carb clean money back. Why? Takes 3 clean holes to act as one start/idle. Lose 1 circuit = Hard starting.

Brake job looks somewhat reasonable... never changed a set so I have no clue. Say diagnostic time is spending a quick hour to determine what? That should have been punched in for time in/time off the diagnostic. Was the very first thing before the wrench is ever turned is... what is the compression? I don't see the numbers is one, and why not kill two birds is the upsell to rebuild the compression back up to spec.

No compression test to continue the work, deduct the time spent chasing tail on the diagnostics. What are the odds I didn't test this one bike and sure enough it was compression. Never started the work on any bike needing valves adjust, general tune up, or anything related to it running, you cover your ass first before you call the customer to proceed, or it's not worth the rebuild and all that pile of shit that the service manager took in feeding a crew of 3 on the slow time.

What is known in the industry is a "Comeback." Yeah, I rode it twice. No, you lapped the block twice, and not thermodynamically set the part to its peak heat range... The pulse generator/the cam sensor/the crank sensor/the I make AC out the wire jobber and all that nomenclature describing... sounds like?

And to be fair, that bill looks somewhat reasonable, nothing showing a red flag to me, sans your answer to the fast start, now knowing 3 open circuits were the cause of the bike starting via one kick... especially electronic ignition in play.
 

Jerome Yee

Member
Let's say what it's not:
1. coil
2. switch
3. spark unit
4. processor black box
5. carb
6. plugs
7. loose wires
8. bad ground

Let's narrow it down to something usually being one thing on the runs-heats up-stops running. Are we talking about a good clutch lever when cold and a lever goes to the grip is the center nut backing out, is the same pattern for the black box to turn into a brick? Or is this your heat cycle of the bike stopped on me, had it cool down and started again kind of scenario?

So is this the sign of a processor on its way out, or the sensor having a heat stroke, minus 4 LOL.

When I left the house the carb, coil, spark unit, wires, ground, is the switch going on and putt-putt to the gas station I go. Tank is [especially] topped off and we are talking within feet if not yards of stalling due to non-venting at the cap. The carb/coil/unit/plugs lit that bike off again is a clean carb if it idles/starts right up, one kick if not a push of the button in a 1/4 of a second, sans a one kick bike in other words... No cleaning needed.


Receipt wise, I do not find a fast starting bike as a carb needing cleaning. Say yes it starts like right now and you get your carb clean money back. Why? Takes 3 clean holes to act as one start/idle. Lose 1 circuit = Hard starting.

Brake job looks somewhat reasonable... never changed a set so I have no clue. Say diagnostic time is spending a quick hour to determine what? That should have been punched in for time in/time off the diagnostic. Was the very first thing before the wrench is ever turned is... what is the compression? I don't see the numbers is one, and why not kill two birds is the upsell to rebuild the compression back up to spec.

No compression test to continue the work, deduct the time spent chasing tail on the diagnostics. What are the odds I didn't test this one bike and sure enough it was compression. Never started the work on any bike needing valves adjust, general tune up, or anything related to it running, you cover your ass first before you call the customer to proceed, or it's not worth the rebuild and all that pile of shit that the service manager took in feeding a crew of 3 on the slow time.

What is known in the industry is a "Comeback." Yeah, I rode it twice. No, you lapped the block twice, and not thermodynamically set the part to its peak heat range... The pulse generator/the cam sensor/the crank sensor/the I make AC out the wire jobber and all that nomenclature describing... sounds like?

And to be fair, that bill looks somewhat reasonable, nothing showing a red flag to me, sans your answer to the fast start, now knowing 3 open circuits were the cause of the bike starting via one kick... especially electronic ignition in play.
After reading four times Lots to think over Thanks Seven
 
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